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How to Prepare for an FDA Inspection

April 12, 2012
11:00 am - 12:30 pm EDT
Online,

Click here for a list of all past FSMA webinars. If you would like to purchase a recording of the webinars, please download the order form and return as directed. 

If you haven’t had a recent FDA inspection you should expect to see FDA inspectors in the next couple of years. FEMA and the American Spice Trade Association are partnering to present a Web seminar focused on what you should expect when an FDA inspector shows up at your door. Speakers will cover U.S. facility and foreign facility inspections.

Increased inspections of foreign food facilities are already underway as part of FSMA and FDA has been directed to double the number in each of the next five years. U.S.-based companies can expect greater scrutiny as well with the frequency of mandated inspections based on risk. At a minimum, all U.S. spice and flavor facilities will likely be inspected once in the next three years.

FEMA is offering a unique opportunity to learn how to prepare for an FDA inspection. Join Joe Levitt and Maile Gradison Hermida of Hogan Lovells for detailed information about how to prepare for an inspection, what to expect and what your rights are. Information will cover both U.S. inspections and inspections of foreign facilities. Prior to entering private practice, Mr. Levitt spent 25 years at the FDA, so you will get an “insider’s” perspective.

Find out how FDA inspections work now and how the agency plans to change its approach to inspections under the Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA). Bottom line – this webinar will help you be ready when an FDA inspector arrives at your facility. FSMA is the most sweeping reform of food safety legislation in recent history, so don’t be caught unprepared! This inspection preparedness Webinar is the first in the FSMA Web seminar series.

FSMA Webinar: How to Prepare for an FDA Inspection
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Did You Know?

In the United States, many flavor companies began as importers of European essential oils and other flavoring substances before expanding to meet local economic and market needs by formulating and manufacturing ingredients domestically.

Fact #7